AXES, MACES and POLEARMS

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AXES AND MACES

The Axe and the Mace are among the oldest weapons known to humankind and have appeared in every culture and in every age where man was capable of crafting tools. Despite the cutting edge of the axe and the bladelike protrusions on some maces, these weapons could do more than just cut and were exceptionally well designed to break and crush.  

Please note that these weapons are replicas of weapons designed to destroy opposing armor, shields or anything else they might encounter. Without proper training even these blunted stage combat weapons will do exactly that to anything they strike. A qualified fight director will know how to properly instruct your actors. Unless designated one of a kind we stock several of the listed type with slight variations in haft or blade. Be sure to call in advance to check on availability or with specific inquiries.

AXES AND MACES DESCRIPTION WEEKLY PRICE
(4 week minimum)
Crusader Axe 36 inches overall; 3 ½ pounds; one of a kind
This style of axe would have been at home in the hands of any European warrior fighting in the Crusades.
Comes with simple ring frog (although it is better carried over the shoulder).
$10
Double-bladed Axes 34 inches overall; 6 pounds; one of a kind
25 inches overall; 4 pounds; one of a kind
Double-bladed axes were historically rare in Europe but have enjoyed great popularity on film. This type comes in a single or two handed variety and their solid steel construction ensures they “ring like a bell.”
$10
Persian Axe 21 inches overall; 4 ½ pounds; one of a kind
This axe is of a style popular in the middle/far east and is a single piece of steel.
$10
Gothic Horseman’s Axe 24 inches overall; 2 ¾ pounds; one of a kind
Short enough to be easily wielded on horseback this axe is similarly constructed to the all steel axes above.
$10
Bearded Axe 24 inches overall; 2 ¼ pounds.
This axe gets its name from the extended lower portion of the blade which resembles a beard...sort of.
$7.50
Viking Axe 24 inches overall; 2 ¼ pounds.
A blade style common to the warlike peoples of Northern Europe from roughly the 5th through 12th centuries.
$7.50

Viking Axe with leather grip

26 inches overall; 2 ¼ pounds; one of a kind
This is similar to the Viking Axe above but with a more ergonomically designed haft and leather wrap.
$10

Spiked Axe

21 inches overall; 3 ¼ pounds; one of a kind
This Axe is for single-handed use and equipped with a nasty looking spike opposite of the main cutting head.
$10

Double-bit Woodsman’s Axe

35 inches overall; 4 ½ pounds; one of a kind
This is your typical woodman’s axe that can be found in any woodpile, psychopath’s tool shed or in the hands of an angry mob. This axe is safely blunted but is still a hefty piece so use with care.
$10

Footman’s War Hammer

34 inches overall; 3 ½ pounds; one of a kind
The War Hammer was designed to punch through and/or crush heavy armor. It was seen on the battlefields of Europe from the 13th and 16th centuries in some form or another. This version is two handed and made to be wielded by foot soldiers.

The warning at the top of the page applies doubly to this weapon as the blunted spike is still capable of punching through a car door (or shield) if used by one untrained in Stage Combat…actually by anyone. Don’t hit things with the spike!
$10

Single-Handed War Hammer

26 inches overall; 3 pounds; one of a kind

This weapon is a smaller version of the War Hammer above and could be wielded in one hand while still on horseback and/or in conjunction with a shield.
$10
Seven Flanged Mace 24 inches overall; 2 ½ pounds; one of a kind
Named for the angled protrusions on the head of this mace the flanged mace was very popular during the late medieval period.
$10
Polish Mace 22 inches overall; 2 ¾ pounds; one of a kind
This mace is a replica of a 15th century weapon of Polish design and features rounded flanges.
$10
Heavy Mace 24 inches overall; 4 ¾ pounds; one of a kind
Although extremely sturdy and certainly up to the task, this mace is exceedingly heavy for most stage combat purposes and is difficult to control when swung. Great for use as a prop.
$7.50

Resin Maces

24 and 32 inches; 1 ¼ and 1 ¾ pounds; one of a kind
These maces have wooden hafts with lightweight resin heads and are quite easy to wield. The 24 inch mace is perfectly suited for use in one hand while the 32 inch mace is best suited for two although it is light enough to be used single-handedly.

$7.50

Double Flail

27 inch haft; 45 inches to tip of weights; 2 ½ pounds.
The flail was yet another weapon adapted from an agricultural tool; in this case the grain flail. The term flail refers to a weapon with a handle and another object, such as a spiked ball or iron weight, connected to it by a flexible joint (a chain, rope, swivel, etc.). This allows for greater speed, and therefore force, to be applied to an object struck by the “business end.”

This flail, like many of the weapons on this page, is another example where the “real” version is essentially the same as the stage version. There are no sharp edges or points but it is still a relatively heavy weight on a stick so care must be used. The flail is particularly difficult to use safely as the chain/weights can be difficult to control (the origin of the term “flailing about”). This is great as a costume prop, but should only be used in stage combat under the direction of an experienced Fight Director.
$7.50

Master-lock Flail

24 inch haft; 40 inches overall; 2 ¼ pounds; one of a kind
This flail was constructed by a survivor of some future (or present?) apocalypse.

See note for Double Flail above.
$7.50
Heavy Mace with punch out design 24 inches overall; 4 ½ pounds; one of a kind
Although extremely sturdy and certainly up to the task, this mace is exceedingly heavy for most stage combat purposes and is difficult to control when swung. Great for use as a prop.
$10

 

 


POLEARMS

From the crudest Stone Age spear to the German "Man-catcher" of the 17th century, polearms have evolved through hundreds, if not thousands, of greatly diverse designs. The primary reason for their proliferation was directly related to its basic form and the advantage that it gave to its wielder: Pole arms were long weapons that allowed you to strike your opponent before they could strike you!

We do not recommend having complete pole arms shipped as the cost is generally prohibitive, although local theatres are certainly welcome to pick them up fully mounted. An alternative is to rent only the head and/or counterweight and then mount on your own haft.  See our weapon care page for information regarding this procedure.Be sure to call in advance to check on availability or with specific inquiries.

POLEARMS DESCRIPTION WEEKLY PRICE
(4 week minimum)
Halberd with counterweight 90 inches overall; 7 pounds.
The pole-arm made famous by the Swiss in the early European Renaissance. Halberds remained ceremonial weapons long after they ceased to be used on the battlefield.
$10
Halberd, head and counterweight only See our weapon care page for information about mounting on your own haft. $7.50
Partisan with counterweight 90 inches overall; 7 pounds.
The Partisan was essentially a spear with wing-like protrusions at the base of the spear blade. It is famously referenced by Marcellus in Hamlet; “Shall I strike at it with my partisan?” Hamlet Act I, scene 1.
$10
Partisan, head and counterweight only See our weapon care page for information about mounting on your own haft. $7.50
Fauchard 53 inches; 4 ½ pounds; one of a kind
The fauchard was originally an agricultural tool and has been in use for more than 1,000 years. It was used primarily to clear underbrush but it was slowly adapted for war (often with the addition of spikes) as more and more peasants were forced into service. The cutting edge was on the concave side.
This model is a modern version more commonly called a “brush hog.”
$10
Greek Spear with butt spike 80 inches overall; 3 ¾ pounds.
The quintessential weapon of the Greek Hoplite complete with butt spike that was used as both counterweight and back-up weapon if the spear head was broken off.
$10
Greek Spear, head and butt spike only See our weapon care page for information about mounting on your own haft. $7.50
Viking Spear 72 inches overall; 2 ½ pounds.
This spear is antiqued to look like hand forged iron with “Viking” designs engraved on the socket. The protruding “wings” would possibly serve to deflect attacks but would also keep the spear from penetrating too deeply into an enemy’s body.
$10
Viking spear, head only See our weapon care page for information about mounting on your own haft. $7.50
Viking Throwing Spear 60 inches overall; 1 ½ pounds.
A Viking would carry several lighter spears (javelins) for throwing at an enemy before closing to hand to hand range.
$7.50
Viking Throwing Spear, head only See our weapon care page for information about mounting on your own haft. $5

 

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